Objectives Chapter 3.  Assumption of Responsibility
Assumption of responsibility will be presented in relation to the British model and the influence in the development of agencies in the United States.
Government agencies on development in the United States.
 Social Security Act
Primary agencies
Host agencies
1. Read Chapter 3 Services and Agencies in Perspective in Arthur Fink (2011). The Field of Social Work.
2. Summarize in your notebook the following topics:
Assumption of responsibility will be presented in relation to the British model and the influence in the development of agencies in the United States.
Government agencies on development in the United States.
 Social Security Act
Primary agencies
Host agencies
2
3
Introduction to Social Work
Second Edition
4
5
Introduction to Social Work
An Advocacy-Based Profession
Second Edition
Lisa E. Cox
Stockton University
Carolyn J. Tice
University of Maryland
Dennis D. Long
Xavier University
6
FOR INFORMATION:
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Copyright © 2019 by SAGE Publications, Inc.
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Printed in the United States of America
Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data
Names: Cox, Lisa E., author. | Tice, Carolyn J., author. | Long, Dennis D., author.
Title: Introduction to social work : an advocacy-based profession / Lisa E. Cox, Stockton University, Carolyn J. Tice, University of Maryland,
Dennis D. Long, Xavier University.
Description: Second edition. | Los Angeles : SAGE, [2019] | Includes bibliographical references and index.
Identifiers: LCCN 2017030913 | ISBN 9781506394534 (hardcover : alk. paper)
Subjects: LCSH: Social service.
Classification: LCC HV40 .C69 2019 | DDC 361.3—dc23 LC record available at https://lccn.loc.gov/2017030913
This book is printed on acid-free paper.
Acquisitions Editor: Joshua Perigo
Editorial Assistant: Alexandra Randall
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Copy Editor: Cate Huisman
Typesetter: C&M Digitals (P) Ltd.
Proofreader: Annette Van Deusen
7
https://lccn.loc.gov/2017030913
Indexer: Kathy Paparchontis
Cover Designer: Gail Buschman
Marketing Manager: Jennifer Jones
8
Brief Contents
1. Preface
2. Acknowledgments
3. About the Authors
4. Part 1 Understanding Social Work
1. 1. The Social Work Profession
2. 2. The History of Social Work
3. 3. Generalist Social Work Practice
4. 4. Advocacy in Social Work
5. Part 2 Responding to Need
1. 5. Poverty and Inequality
2. 6. Family and Child Welfare
3. 7. Health Care and Health Challenges
4. 8. Physical, Cognitive, and Developmental Challenges
5. 9. Mental Health
6. 10. Substance Use and Addiction
7. 11. Helping Older Adults
8. 12. Criminal Justice
6. Part 3 Working in Changing Contexts
1. 13. Communities at Risk and Housing
2. 14. The Changing Workplace
3. 15. Veterans, Their Families, and Military Social Work
4. 16. Environmentalism
5. 17. International Social Work
7. Epilogue: Social Work and Self-Care
8. Appendix: Code of Ethics of the National Association of Social Workers: Summary of Major Principles
9. Glossary
10. References
11. Index
9
Detailed contents
Preface
Acknowledgments
About the Authors
Part 1 Understanding Social Work
1: The Social Work Profession
Learning Objectives
Mary Considers Social Work
The Professional Social Worker
Social Work’s Unique Purpose and Goals
Social Work and Human Diversity
Diversity and Social Justice
Intersections of Diversity
Theory and Practice
Social Work Values
The NASW Code of Ethics
Professionalism
Advocacy
Social Work Education
Social Work Degrees
Bachelor of Social Work
Master of Social Work
Doctor of Philosophy in Social Work or Doctor of Social Work
Field Education
Certificates and Certifications
Social Work Practice
Social Work Roles and Settings
Levels of Practice
Social Work as a Career Opportunity
Summary
Top 10 Key Concepts
Discussion Questions
Exercises
Online Resources
2: The History of Social Work
Learning Objectives
Brian Organizes Farmworkers
Social Welfare
10
Social Welfare Policy
Conservative and Liberal Ideologies
Social Control
Social Justice
The Intertwined History of Social Welfare Policy and Social Work
Colonial America: 1607 to 1783
Nineteenth Century America: 1784 to 1890
The Progressive Era: 1890 to 1920
World War I: 1914 to 1918
The Great Depression: 1929 to Early 1940s
Rank and File Movement
World War II: 1939 to 1945
America’s War on Poverty: 1960 to 1967
Reaganomics: 1981 to 1989
Partisan Gridlock
The Limitations of Social Welfare
Summary
Top 10 Key Concepts
Discussion Questions
Exercises
Online Resources
3: Generalist Social Work Practice
Learning Objectives
Layla Intervenes at All Levels to Help People Who Are Homeless
Knowledge Base for Generalist Social Workers
Theoretical Foundations of Generalist Practice
Systems Theory
Ecological Perspective
Empowerment Theory
Strengths Perspective
Evidence-Based Practice
Roles for Generalist Social Workers
Levels of Generalist Practice
Social Work With Individuals (Micro Level)
Social Work With Families and Groups (Mezzo or Meso Level)
Social Work With Organizations, Communities, and Society (Macro Level)
The Change Process
Engagement
Assessment
Planning
11
Implementation
Evaluation
Advocates for Change
Summary
Top 10 Key Concepts
Discussion Questions
Exercises
Online Resources
4: Advocacy in Social Work
Learning Objectives
Nancy Advocates to Professionalize Social Work in Her State
The Need for Professional Advocates
Power and Social Inequality
The Ethics of Advocacy
Client Self-Determination
Self-Interest and Advocacy
Individual Benefit Versus Community Benefit
Pathways to Community Benefit
Human Aspects of Helping
Social Workers and Social Change
Cause and Function
Responses to Hard Times
Cause Advocacy Today
The Cost of Advocacy
A Model for Dynamic Advocacy
The Cycle of Advocacy
The Advocacy Model in Action
Tenets of Advocacy Practice and Policy Model
Economic and Social Justice
Supportive Environment
Human Needs and Rights
Political Access
Summary
Top 10 Key Concepts
Discussion Questions
Exercises
Online Resources
Part 2 Responding to Need
5: Poverty and Inequality
Learning Objectives
12
Steve Sees the Face of Poverty
Poverty
Measures of Poverty
Poverty and Inequality
The Face of Poverty
Women
People of Color
Children
People Who Are Homeless
Social Service Programs for The Those Who Are Poor
Temporary Assistance for Needy Families
Medicaid
Supplemental Security Income
Healthy Meals for Healthy Americans
Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program
Earned-Income Tax Credit
Public Housing
Diversity and Poverty
Advocacy on Behalf of the People Living in Poverty
Current Trends in Advocacy With People Who Are Poor
Dynamic Advocacy and Poverty
Economic and Social Justice
Supportive Environment
Human Needs and Rights
Political Access
The Cycle of Advocacy
Your Career and Poverty
Summary
Top 10 Key Concepts
Discussion Questions
Exercises
Online Resources
6: Family and Child Welfare
Learning Objectives
Rosa Works to Strengthen Families for the Sake of Children
Today’s Families
Diverse Family Forms
Divorce
Separation
Blended Families
13
Single-Parent Households
Same-Sex Marriage and Parenting
Marriage Equality
Cohabitation
Family Problems
Domestic Violence
Child Maltreatment
Child Welfare Services
History of Child and Family Services
Parental Versus Child Rights
A Global Context for Child Protection
Key Child and Family Services
Social Policy and Legislation Supporting Child and Family Services
Public Attitudes Toward Services for Children and Families
Social Workers’ Attitudes Toward Child and Family Services
Social Work in Schools
Challenges Facing School Social Workers
Violence and Bullying
Economically Disadvantaged and Homeless Students
Students With Physical and Mental Challenges
Teen Pregnancy
Improvements in Education to Help Parents and Children
Diversity and Family and Child Welfare
Advocacy on Behalf of Families and Children
Current Trends in Advocacy for Child and Family Services
Dynamic Advocacy and Family and Child Welfare
Economic and Social Justice
Supportive Environment
Human Needs and Rights
Political Access
Your Career in Family and Child Welfare
Summary
Top 10 Key Concepts
Discussion Questions
Exercises
Online Resources
7: Health Care and Health Challenges
Learning Objectives
Gayle Practices Social Work in a Teaching Hospital
Health Challenges and the American Health Care System
14
Threats to Americans’ Health
Chronic Illness
Heart Disease
Stress
Health Disparities and the Uninsured
Health Care Policy in the United States
Health Insurance
Affordable Care Act
Health Care Trends
Integrative Medicine
Slow Medicine
Prevention and Wellness
Recovery, Rehabilitation, and Resilience
Inflammation
Managed Care
Electronic Medical Records
Health Care and Social Work
History of Health Social Work
Social Workers’ Roles in Health Care Practice
Health Care Settings
Emergency Rooms and Trauma and Urgent Care Centers
Hospitals and Acute Care
Veterans Affairs Hospitals
Home Health Care
Long-Term Care
Hospice, End-of-Life, and Palliative Care
Rehabilitation Services
Clinics
Public Health Services
Diversity and Health Care
Advocacy on Behalf of People With Health Care Challenges
Economic and Social Justice
Supportive Environment
Human Needs and Rights
Political Access
Your Career in Health Care
Summary
Top 10 Key Concepts
Discussion Questions
Exercises
15
Online Resources
8: Physical, Cognitive, and Developmental Challenges
Learning Objectives
Joe Advocates for People With Intellectual Challenges
Definitions of Physical, Cognitive, and Developmental Challenges
Types of Physical, Cognitive, and Developmental Challenges
Developmental Challenges
Physical or Mobility Challenges
Mental/Cognitive Challenges
Stigma and Discrimination Against People With Physical, Cognitive, and Developmental
Challenges
Social Work With People Living With Physical, Cognitive, and Developmental Challenges
Historical Background of Services for People Living With Physical, Cognitive, or
Developmental Challenges
Deinstitutionalization
Americans With Disabilities Act
Social Work Practice With Physical, Cognitive, and Developmental Challenges
Person-First Language
Services for Persons With Physical, Cognitive, and Developmental Challenges
Diversity and Physical, Cognitive, and Developmental Challenges
Advocacy on Behalf of People With Physical, Cognitive, or Developmental Challenges
Economic and Social Justice
Supportive Environment
Human Needs and Rights
Political Access
Your Career Working With People Who Have Physical, Cognitive, and Developmental
Challenges
Summary
Top 10 Key Concepts
Discussion Questions
Exercises
Online Resources
9: Mental Health
Learning Objectives
Joyce Seeks Knowledge to Help With Her Broad Caseload at a Mental Health Center
Mental Health and Mental Illness
Definitions of Mental Health Status
Normal Versus Abnormal Mental Health
Mental Health Disorders and the DSM
Evolution of the Mental Health System
16
Institutionalization and Deinstitutionalization
Medicalization of Mental Illness
Social Work Perspectives
Mental Deficits Versus Personal Assets
Mental Health Parity and the Affordable Care Act
Social Work Practice in Mental Health
Social Work Roles in Mental Health Services
Mental Health Literacy
Mental Health Settings
Digital Mental Health Information and Therapy
Diversity and Mental Health
Advocacy on Behalf of People With Mental Health Issues
Economic and Social Justice
Supportive Environment
Human Needs and Rights
Political Access
Your Career in Mental Health Social Work
Summary
Top 10 Key Concepts
Discussion Questions
Exercises
Online Resources
10: Substance Use and Addiction
Learning Objectives
Clayton Uses His Addiction Experience in Community Outreach
Substance Use as a Mental Disorder
Causes of Substance Use
Codependency
Addictive Substances and Behaviors
Alcohol
Prescription Drugs
Illegal Drugs and Marijuana
Anabolic Steroids
Tobacco and Nicotine
Food and Caffeine
Gambling
Sex Addiction
Policies Related to Substance Use
Social Work Practice in Substance Use and Addiction
Prevention of Substance Use Disorder
17
Treatments and Interventions for Substance Use and Addiction
Detoxification and Recovery
Motivational Interviewing
Alcoholics and Narcotics Anonymous
Needle-Exchange Programs
Methadone Treatment Programs
Diversity and Substance Use and Treatment
Advocacy and Substance Use Disorder
Economic and Social Justice
Supportive Environment
Human Needs and Rights
Political Access
Your Career in Substance Use and Addictions
Certifications in Substance use: cadc and ladc
Summary
Top 10 Key Concepts
Discussion Questions
Exercises
Online Resources
11: Helping Older Adults
Learning Objectives
Emilee Adores Gerontological Social Work
Aging and Older Adults
Meanings of “Aging” and “Old”
Stages of Older Adulthood
Longevity
An Aging Populace
Gerontological Social Work Practice
Evolution of Gerontological Practice
Social Work Roles in Gerontology and Geriatrics
Resources for Successful Aging
Living Options
Day Programs
Benefit Programs
Culturally Competent Care of Older Adults
Issues of Aging and Old Age
Biological and Physiological Aspects of Aging
Cognitive and Psychological Aspects of Aging
Neurocognitive Disorders (Dementias)
Depression, Mental Health, and Other Emotional Problems
18
Substance Use/Addictions
Sexual Activity
Loneliness
Suicide
Social Aspects of Aging
Ageism
Aging in Place
Caregiving
Long-Term Care
Elder Abuse
Spiritual Aspects of Aging
Benefits of Spirituality and Religion in Old Age
Illness, Death, and Faith
Policies Affecting Older Adults
Diversity and Aging
Age
Class
Ethnicity and Race
Gender
Sexual Orientation
Ability
Intersections of Diversity
Advocacy and Aging
Economic and Social Justice
Supportive Environment
Human Needs and Rights
Political Access
Your Career in Gerontology
Summary
Top 10 Key Concepts
Discussion Questions
Exercises
Online Resources
12: Criminal Justice
Learning Objectives
Michelle Combats Racial and Ethnic Imbalances in the Juvenile Justice System
Central Concepts in Criminal Justice and Crime
Types of Crimes
The Contextual Nature of Crime
The Correctional System
19
Juvenile Justice and Corrections
Conflicting Attitudes About Those Who Commit Crimes
Attitudes Toward Punishment
Attitudes Toward Rehabilitation
Social Workers and the Criminal Justice System
Forensic Social Work
Social Work Values Regarding Criminal Justice
Interactions With the Criminal Justice System
Police
Courts
Attorneys
Corrections Officers
Victim Assistance Programs
Deviant Behavior and Social Status
Mental Health and Criminal Justice
Issues Affecting Children and Youth
Exposure and Desensitization to Violent Behavior
Parental Imprisonment
Diversity and Criminal Justice
Specific Disparities in the Criminal Justice System
Racial
Women
Advocacy and Criminal Justice
Economic and Social Justice
Supportive Environment
Human Needs and Rights
Political Access
Your Career in Criminal Justice
Summary
Top 10 Key Concepts
Discussion Questions
Exercises
Online Resources
Part 3 Working in Changing Contexts
13: Communities at Risk and Housing
Learning Objectives
Tonya Supports Residents of Federally Subsidized Housing
Central Concepts Regarding Communities and Housing
Community Practice
At-Risk Communities
20
Housing
Homeownership
Rental Housing
Subsidized Housing
Shared Housing
Halfway Houses
Shelters
Residential Treatment Centers and Hospitalization
Social Work Practice in Housing and Communities
Clients’ Housing Issues
Foreclosure
Landlords
Eviction
Substandard Housing
Social Work With At-Risk Communities
Segregated Communities
Equal Opportunities for Housing
Transportation and Connectivity
Community Development and Resources
Policy Issues Related to Communities and Housing
Homelessness
Affordable Housing
Community Asset Building
Segregation
Diversity and Housing
Advocacy and Housing
Economic and Social Justice
Supportive Environment
Human Needs and Rights
Political Access
Your Career in Housing Services and Community Practice
Summary
Top 10 Key Concepts
Discussion Questions
Exercises
Online Resources
14: The Changing Workplace
Learning Objectives
Deidre Experiences Firsthand the Realities of the Contemporary Workplace
The History of Work
21
Traditional Societies
Agricultural Era: 1630 to 1760
Industrial Revolution: 1760 to 1840
Urbanization: 1860 to 1950
Information Age: 1960 to Present
Current Social Trends Related to Work
Work-Related Issues
Unemployment
Underemployment
Minimum Wage
Gender Inequality
Harassment
Lack of Union Participation
Occupational Health Hazards
Social Welfare and the Changing Workplace
Social Insurance Programs
Unemployment Insurance
Workers’ Compensation
Social Security
Social Welfare Policies
Affirmative Action
Americans With Disabilities Act
Diversity and the Changing Workplace
Age
Class
Gender
Sexual Orientation
Intersections of Diversity
Advocacy and the Changing Workplace
Economic and Social Justice
Supportive Environment
Human Needs and Rights
Political Access
Your Career in the World of Work
Summary
Top 10 Key Concepts
Discussion Questions
Exercises
Online Resources
15: Veterans, Their Families, and Military Social Work
22
Learning Objectives
Veteran Javier Experienced Military Life and Now Counsels Families
The Armed Services and Military Culture
What It Means to Be a Soldier
How War Affects Soldiers
How the Military Takes Care of Its Own
Social Work With the Military and Veterans
A History of Military Social Work
Behavioral Health Problems of Service Members and Veterans
Traumatic Brain Injury
Posttraumatic Stress Disorder
Substance Use Disorders
Suicide
Issues Affecting Wounded Military Veterans
Issues Affecting Military Families
Programs and Policies for Military Personnel, Veterans, and Their Families
Social Work Assessment and Intervention Skills
Common Types of Therapy
Multidisciplinary Team Approach
Diversity and Military Social Work
Age
Class
Ethnicity/Race
Gender
Sexual Orientation
Intersections of Diversity
Advocacy for Veterans and Members of the Military
Economic and Social Justice
Supportive Environment
Human Needs and Rights
Political Access
Your Career in Military Social Work
Summary
Top 10 Key Concepts
Discussion Questions
Exercises
Online Resources
16: Environmentalism
Learning Objectives
Betty Confronts a Natural Disaster
23
Environmentalism and Social Work
Social Work Leadership in Environmentalism
Mary Richmond
Jane Addams
National Association of Social Workers
Council on Social Work Education
Ecological Social Welfare and Practice
Sustainability
Ecological Justice
Ecological Ethics
Environmental Issues
Overpopulation
Pollutants
Climate Change
Environmental Disasters
Flooding
Drought
Hurricanes
Famine
Diversity and Environmentalism
Age
Class
Gender
Sexual Orientation
Intersections of Diversity
Advocacy and Environmentalism
Economic and Social Justice
Supportive Environment
Human Needs and Rights
Political Access
Your Career in Environmentalism
Summary
Top 10 Key Concepts
Discussion Questions
Exercises
Online Resources
17: International Social Work
Learning Objectives
Teresa Applies Her Multicultural Background to Social Work
International Social Work
24
Level of National Development
Social Work Principles for International Practice
Transnational Identities
Cultural Competence
Bilingualism and Multilingualism
Comparative Social Policy
Principles of Ethics
Charity and Empowerment
Social Development
Current Issues Facing International Social Workers
HIV/AIDS
Child Welfare
Poverty
Refugees
Safety and Self-Care
Diversity and International Practice
Age
Class
Ethnicity
Race
Gender
Sexual Orientation
Intersections of Diversity
Advocacy and International Social Work
Economic and Social Justice
Environmental Justice
Human Needs and Rights
Political Access
Your Career in International Social Work
International Job Opportunities
Volunteering, Experiential Learning, and Field Education
Summary
Top 10 Key Concepts
Discussion Questions
Exercises
Online Resources
Epilogue: Social Work and Self-Care
Appendix: Code of Ethics of the National Association of Social Workers: Summary of Major Principles
Glossary
References
25
Index
26
27
Preface
When the idea of writing a book was first proposed, our thoughts turned to those people with whom we
wanted to work over a long period of time. Said another way, we recognized that successful writing
partnerships are built on trust, honesty, and commitment. We feel fortunate that those essential elements
culminated not only in lasting friendships but in dedication to a profession that is very much part of our lives.
The completion of this second edition of our book further confirms the worth of highly valued relationships,
lasting friendships, and collective professional commitment.
28
Our Impetus for Writing This Book
We think the second edition of Introduction to Social Work continues to be a timely new text for adoption in
introductory social work courses. Why? Because our book has been crafted to align with the profession’s
historical roots of advocacy for human rights and social, economic, and environmental justice. We know
through our practice and community involvement with social service agencies that many social workers have
been urging and taking a much more active approach in client and community-based advocacy. Throughout
our book, advocacy is described at a clinical/client level and also at organizational, community, national, and
international levels. We encourage readers to connect the needs of individuals with those of society by linking
direct practice to policy development. Engaging in such analytical thinking integrates micro and macro
practice into a holistic perspective of practice underpinned by human needs and rights.
A unique aspect of Introduction to Social Work continues to be its advocacy framework for understanding the
historical development of social work, important figures influencing social work history, multiple practice
settings, and the types of practice performed. The advocacy practice and policy model comprising four
interlocking components—economic and social justice, supportive environment, human needs and rights, and
political access—provides a lens for viewing social issues of the day. Additionally, the model serves as a vehicle
to place special emphasis on human diversity, cultural competence, and intersections of diversity.
Pertinent information is provided regarding professional use of self and contemporary applications to practice
settings to adapt to a changing digital workplace and world. These applications view social workers as
professional practitioners and client and community advocates, thereby offering a clear alternative to the
perspectives of competing books. Features such as Time to Think boxes, Social Work in Action, Spotlight on
Advocacy, and Current Trends provide examples of social work’s dynamic force and contribution to
confronting complicated life situations on individual, group, local, state, national, and international levels.
Vignettes appear across all chapters and are modeled after real-life situations faced by professional social
workers. Perhaps more important, the book’s features prompt readers to pause in thought and consider their
opinions, perspectives, reactions, and strategies related to events often far from their own reality. Our book
encourages readers to stretch and think beyond, to connect the dots, and to critically analyze issues, beliefs,
concepts, and environments. These aspects of cognitive discourse set our book apart from other introductory
textbooks.
In this second edition of our book, special attention was given to feedback from readers and reviewers of our
first edition. Noteworthy changes contained in our second edition are captured below:
Areas for advocacy in social work shift over time. With the election of President Trump and a
republican Senate and House of Representatives, contemporary topics involving social work advocacy
and political action at the federal level have been added and updated, especially in the area of health care
reform.
Increased attention has been given to ethics and the need to apply ethical considerations in social work
practice.
29
A concerted effort has been made to include additional person-first language throughout the text.
Content involving the intersections of diversity and multicultural practice has been enriched.
Additional attention has been given to substance use and addiction services.
30
Structure of the Book
Introduction to Social Work is organized into three parts. Part I introduces readers to a definition of social work,
reviews the history of the profession, and describes advocacy as a major aspect of social work. In this section of
the book, the advocacy practice and policy model is defined through examples and applications. Throughout
the book, the elements of the model serve as themes for exploring practice and policy content areas and
connecting them to vignettes that highlight critical features of each chapter.
In Part II, the chapters examine how social workers respond to human needs—poverty and inequality, family
and child welfare, health care and health challenges, physical and mental challenges, mental health, substance
use and addiction, helping older adults, and criminal justice. The chapters in this section assess the strengths
of people and communities in support of possible advocacy strategies. At every juncture, social workers are
seen as leaders, experts, cofacilitators, and innovators who understand complexities, value diversity, appreciate
the role of culture, and address ethical dilemmas.
We are pleased to write that Part III of Introduction to Social Work goes beyond the standard text coverage by
including chapters on communities at risk and housing; the changing workplace; veterans, their families, and
military social work; environmentalism; and international social work. Each of these chapters introduces
material especially selected to stimulate intellectual curiosity about current topics of relevance, such as climate
change and posttraumatic stress disorder. Additionally, the role of housing is examined in reference to quality
of life and opportunity, the culture of the military is defined so as to better frame the needs of service
personnel and their families, and environmental issues are described innovatively to encourage social work
professionals to be more involved in all forms of life and service.
Each chapter ends with a list of online resources that correspond to the chapter’s content and offer readers the
option to explore multiple topics in more detail. Discussion questions and key concepts are also provided to
support class discussions and possible in-class and out-of-class assignments. A high-interest end-of-chapter
feature titled “Your Career . . .” introduces possible career paths in social work related to the chapter content,
along with thought-provoking questions and/or applications.
31
Making Course Content Come Alive
Although we now primarily identify as educators, we have been molded by our social work practice
experiences, current service endeavors, and the evolving world around us. No matter our work responsibilities,
the classroom remains our playing field where we hope to convey the important role social workers play in
society and people’s lives. We contend that advocacy is critical to teaching, research, and service.
Consequently, Introduction to Social Work is designed to generate critical thinking and discussion, encourage
interactive learning and reflective thinking, and expand horizons. The text will be in e-book format, and
ancillaries are also available. In other words, we took a multisensory approach to teaching and learning that
extends the walls of the classroom to the community and well beyond.
To facilitate teaching, Introduction to Social Work is closely aligned with the Council on Social Work
Education’s new Educational Policy and Accreditation Standards and incorporates reflective practice,
encouraging students to engage in critical thought and reflection and to contemplate a professional social
work career. As suggested by the butterfly on the cover, life is precious, colorful, fragile, and ever changing.
We hope this book will contribute to each reader’s transformation as a person and aspiring professional.
32
SAGE edge
SAGE edge offers a robust online environment featuring an impressive array of tools and resources for review,
study, and further exploration, keeping both instructors and students on the cutting edge of teaching and
learning. SAGE edge content is open access and available on demand. Learning and teaching has never been
easier!
SAGE edge for Students provides a personalized approach to help students accomplish their coursework goals
in an easy-to-use learning environment. Here is a list of features:
Mobile-friendly eFlashcards strengthen understanding of key terms and concepts.
Mobile-friendly practice quizzes allow for independent assessment by students of their mastery of course
material.
Carefully selected chapter-by-chapter video links and multimedia content enhance classroom-based
explorations of key topics.
Interactive exercises and meaningful web links facilitate student use of Internet resources, further
exploration of topics, and responses to critical thinking questions.
EXCLUSIVE! SAGE edge for Students includes access to full-text SAGE journal articles that have
been carefully selected to support and expand on the concepts presented in each chapter.
SAGE edge for Instructors supports teaching by making it easy to integrate quality content and create a rich
learning environment for students. These features include the following:
Test banks provide a …




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