Summarize the three most important things you have learned in this PDF.
Three to five-paragraph.
Felician University | Access 2016_ Basic Database Introduction.mp4
What is Access? Access is a database. What is a database? A database is a software program, where you can
store and organize all of your data into. For example, let’s say, I want to keep track of all of the employees in my
company. I want to be able to store their information, like their first name, last name, date of birth– so I can send
them a big, fat birthday card on their birthday– and also their phone numbers, maybe their hourly rate or salary.
All of that information, I can create and store.
And for each employee that I have, there’s going to be a record. So for example, me, Kirt Kershaw, I’ll have my
first name and last name in this database. Also, I can add my home address, the hourly rate that I make. All of
that creates one record of information and one record for each employee.
OK, other things I can keep track of are products. My company sells products and I want to keep track of them
separate from my employees. Now, in Microsoft Access, to keep track of them separately, they have what are
called tables. So this is a table of information all about the employees who work for my company. And in a
separate table about products, in here, I can create and store things like the product ID, the product name, how
much I have an inventory or on stock, all about products.
I also have orders. So every time a client makes an order, I want to keep track of that order. Maybe I have the
order ID, also, the date when the order is made. So in case, if we have things like a warranty issue and the client
says, hey, man, totally want a replacement or a refund. Well, we can look inside the table, and if we have the
order date, and if we see it’s 90 days out, well, then we can tell the client it’s no longer under warranty. Again, we
can keep track of those things within the Orders table.
And then, we finally have clients themselves. We can have the company’s name, or the first name and last name
of the client, their address, shipping address, credit card information on file, things like that. Now, Microsoft Access
is what is called the relational database. A relational database means that these tables can relate to each other.
Let me put it to you this way, when you have a filing cabinet, and you have information on your employees,
products, your clients, those who purchased your products, do you dump them all into one filing cabinet or all into
one folder? Yeah, as if. And let’s say, later on, you want to pull up just an employee. Ah, well, that’s really
inefficient. Because first of all, you have to have this 20-pound folder out, and then, secondly, you have to sort
through the products, the orders just to get to and find your employees. I mean, what a waste of time.
So in a relational database, for example, you create, again, what are called separate tables or separate folders.
And what that means is that, for example, if I want to pull up the clients, that’s easy to pull up. But if I want to pull
up the clients and I want to keep track of all of the products that one client has purchased, like Client XYZ, then
when I want to do is I want to create, again, Microsoft being a relational database, a relationship between the
products and clients.
So I can come over here to the Products and say, look, I want to extract some of this data. I want to find out all of
the clients who purchase product X. And maybe I want to do some target marketing to those clients. So there’s no
way I can pull up the products just by themselves without this relationship and take a guess and say, hm, they
purchased this. Or go to the Clients and say, OK, I wonder which products they purchased?
But if I go ahead and create a relationship, again, Access being a relational database, then for every product
that’s purchased, it’s going to be tied to a client here. Not only that, but for every product purchased, it’s through
an order. So we’ll have a relationship between the products and the orders as well. And we’ve got the order ID
and have the date of the purchase, things like that.
So we’ll have the clients relate to the orders for every time they want to purchase a product because the orders
are going to keep track of that, the date that they made the purchase. Again, breaking it down, I’m not going to
pull all of this information up. If I just want to find out how many orders a client has made, I’m just going pull up
these two tables, and of course, have a relationship between the two. And it will be accurate because they’re
relating to each other.
So for every order a client has made, it will show me the date that they need the order. And if I just want to keep
track of how many orders they made, then I just need these two tables. I don’t have to pull up the employees. I
mean, that makes no sense for the products. So it really becomes more efficient when you break it down into the
smallest, most meaningful parts, or, in this case, tables. All of my orders are in one. All of the products are in one.
All of the clients are in one, and so on.
So you’re really organizing your data and breaking them down, and you’re going to relate them or create
relationships. So if you do need a pull up related items, like the products or the clients, you can do it in a jiff.
Now, Access is more than just tables of information. In fact, what makes Access so powerful is that once you
create your tables, or your data in these tables, is the ability to manipulate that data and pull up what you want,
when you want. So for example, let’s say I’ve got 200 employees. I don’t want to go through each employee’s
record and find out if the employee has benefits or doesn’t have benefits.
I want to be able to instantly create a query and pull up all of the employees who don’t have benefits, just filter out
those who have it, and filter in those who don’t. Let’s say, out of 200, it automatically pulls up 25 I mean, that’s
fast. That’s efficient. And that’s what they call a query in Access. And then, based on the query, I can create a
report, print or email that off to HR, and I have them go ahead and contact those employees to be able to offer
them benefits.
Also, you can control how the information is being entered into your database and, in this case, into your tables,
the employees. So for example, if I hired a new employee, I want to be able to have the first thing they enter is the
employee ID, and then the employee’s first name, last name– well, just think of it this way. Have you ever done
shopping over the web, and you’ve gone to a web page, and you put in the first name, last name, and they have
those fields up at the top?
Well, in Access, you can control where you place those fields and what fields come first, and even the data to be
entered, like the maximum and minimum number of, let’s say, a five-digit zip code. So you can move the fields
around and what you want to see first up at the top or at the bottom or in the middle, also control the amount of
data or the type of data being entered into a field, like if you want a unique identification number for the employee,
maybe it’s going to be their social security number.
Well, you can just say only nine digits can be entered into this field, so nobody hits an extra key or types in eight
digits without a validation that says, ah, you’re missing a digit, or, oh, that’s too many. So you can get more
accurate data results by being able to control the user’s input. In fact, let me go to the next slide in my PowerPoint
presentation and break this down.
Now, Access has what are called objects. And as we just learned in the previous slide, the foundation of all objects
are tables, because, let’s face it, without a table of data, you don’t have a database. So we’ve got to have some
data. And to store the data, we create a table. And we break the data down into its smallest, most meaningful
parts– in this case, tables. For example, we had a table all based upon employees, a separate table for our
orders, our clients, our products, and so on.
Now, before we go any further, I strongly recommend that you actually watch our Microsoft Excel 2016 training
videos. That is, if you’re not familiar with Excel, because Access has a lot of similarities to Excel, except that Excel
is a bit more simplistic. And it’s a great introduction to the Access tables.
For example, I’m going to go ahead and click on this link here to open up my Excel 2016 workbook and give you
an introduction into tables, because Access tables in this Excel, what they call a spreadsheet here, are the same
in that they have cells. And these cells make up a spreadsheet or, in Access, they would make up a table.
And you can see over here on the left-hand side, I have a database here on my Dream Force’s payroll. And I’m
keeping track of all of my employees, their first name, last name, social security number. You see, I’ve got all of
this information here, and so that makes up a database. And you can say, look, if I can create a database in
Excel, why don’t I use Excel?
Well, you may want to use Excel to store your information to keep track of it because, in Excel, you can actually do
some sorting, like you can sort it by last name here, and you can also filter as well, like over here, in the Benefits
column, those who have benefits and those who don’t. But on a very simplistic level, because Excel really wasn’t
meant to be the end-all of end-all databases. It’s something to get started on.
Also, Excel performs functions and calculations, like, for example, I have the hours for Max Klinger here. There’s
his hours, how much he gets paid per hour. And what I did is I multiplied these cells together to get his gross for
that week. And those are the things you’re going to be learning and doing an Access.
So in other words, if you want to come in here and learn about Excel, and you feel comfortable with moving
around in these cells and typing an information into the cells, and performing calculations and being able to sort
information in Excel, then you’ve got the grasp, or the basics of how to work with tables in Microsoft Access.
In fact, think of Access database built for small to mid-sized businesses. Well, what about large businesses? Let’s
say you’re a huge business and you’ve got thousands of employees and millions of clients, you’ll want something
perhaps a little bit more powerful, maybe like Oracle. But when it comes to the hierarchical structure within
Microsoft, Excel is the way to start learning about databases and how to perform calculations. And then Access is
the next step up.
For example, in Excel here, you can’t print reports or design a report as far as the face value goes, because what
you see is what you get. So if that works better for you, go ahead and stay with Excel. But if you want to continue
with Access, I strongly recommend that you watch my Excel 2016 Level 1 training videos and get the basics of
Excel until you feel comfortable with it. So let me go ahead and close out of Excel here and go back to my
PowerPoint presentation and finish off our objects.
So once we have our data, our raw, organized data, the tables, then we can go ahead and query out the
information from those tables. We can say, look, we want to see all of the employees who don’t have any benefits.
That’s what’s called a query. It instantly filters out those employees who do have benefits and only pulls on those
who don’t without having to scroll through perhaps dozens, hundreds, or thousands of records to find those who
don’t.
On top of a query, Access has what are called forms and reports. Again, a form is something you can create as a
place where you can organize the fields and control how the user inputs data into the table– because again, a
table is where you can store all of your data. So this form is just basically a place where you can actually type in
information. Once you type it in, it dumps it right into the table. And forms you can make look really nice when it
comes to organizing the fields and what people see and what they see first.
Think of it like this way, like a report. A report is information you’re taking from the table. So you can actually print
it off and/or email it to somebody, but in an organized way. Just as a form is a way of entering in information, a
report is a way of pulling out information in a nice, organized manner. And then finally, you want to be able to
define those objects a little bit more in detail, so let’s go to the next slide.
So a form, by definition, will display information from the table or query because, again, a query is based upon a
table. Or you can enter in new information, new data, new records. It’s a way of being able to control what the
user inputs that’s going to store in the table. And again, a table is raw, organized data. Now, a report is the
printable results of forms or queries. You can actually turn a form into a report and email it or print it off.
And again, forms are based upon either queries or tables. And queries are based upon tables. So as long as you
have that link, that it’s based upon the table or tables, you’re going to be able to create a report. And what are
queries? It’s just another way to retrieve data from a table, to be able to filter in and filter out specific information,
what you want to see or don’t want to see. And finally, again, emphasizing the table. Without data, without
information, without records, without names, addresses stored, you don’t have a database.
So as long as you have records, everything’s all right, because then, you can query those records, create a report
based upon those records, and also have a form to input information to store in the table to continue on creating
additional records. I’m going to go ahead and end my PowerPoint presentation and close out of here.
And what you’re looking at here is Windows 7. And what I want to do is, to open up Access is– I can do it one of
many ways. But for the sake of this training video, every time you open up Access, I don’t want to come down
here on the Start button to go find it. Well, I’ll find it the first time.
But I’ll want to create a shortcut to that program and put it on my Desktop or down below on the Taskbar, so I can
just click on it once on the Taskbar, or double click it on the Desktop, again, without coming down here to the Start
button, and going to All Programs, and then trying to find it. OK, there it is. See, that took quite a few clicks. So
when I find it, if I right-click on it, and I pin it to the Taskbar, see, it’s down there. Ooh, that’s fancy.
Or I can right-click on it and send it to the Desktop as a shortcut. And then I click off. It’s right there or it’s right
there. So now we’re ready to go, either with a single-click to open up Access or double-click on the shortcut on the
Desktop. Thanks for watching. Hey, as a quick reminder, if you like my video, please give it a thumbs up. You can
also click on me and subscribe to my channel, get notified of the latest videos. And for only $2 a month, you can
have access to all of my Microsoft Office training videos.
Felician University | Microsoft Access 2016 for Beginners.mp4
[MUSIC PLAYING]
In this session, we’re going to create a database from scratch, and we are done there learn about some of the
various components of Microsoft Access 2016 so we can kind of understand how the application works and where
the different components are.
So once we open Microsoft Access, we click here on the Blank Database, and like we learned earlier, the first
thing that we need to do after we click on the Blank Database, we need to give it a name. And take note where
you’re saving this database.
Now, as soon as you open the Access database here, what we have is very similar to Microsoft Word and Excel
and other applications in Office 2016. On the very top, we have the Quick Access toolbar with a bunch of
commonly-used options. We have the File tab here. And then we have these different tabs of Home, the most
commonly used functions– very similar to other applications. Then we have here that Create tab. This is to create
different components related to databases– for example, creating a table, creating queries, creating forms and
reports.
Then, we have the External Data tab. This is basically for us to get data from other systems and import it and link
it into a database here in Microsoft Access. And then Database Tools– this is another tab where we can design
the database and define the relationships or define basically any tools related to the database here for whether to
repair the database, to create macros, or other components.
Then, we have here this new tab called Table Tools. So Table Tools here– this is very similar to the Contextual
Tools in Microsoft Word or Excel– basically, a new tab that shows up in the context of what we are doing. So right
now, we are creating a new table, and it’s giving us options here for this new table.
Next to it here, you have also Tell Me What You Want to Do, or the Tell Me feature. This is new in Office 2016, so
basically, if you wanted to learn how to use Query Wizard or how to create a new form or anything like that, you’ll
simply type in there how to do that. So for example, Query Wizard, and it just basically takes you directly to that
option in order to learn how to perform a specific task in Microsoft Access.
And then, notice on the bottom here– you have a couple other options, and I’m not going to take the time to tinker
with those too much. It’s basically the design view and the normal view, and we’ll cover those shortly.
Now, creating our first database here– databases, as I mentioned earlier, are designed using tables. So typically,
you’ll have at least one or more table. So now this is our first table that we are working with, and we’ll give it a
you’ll have at least one or more table. So now this is our first table that we are working with, and we’ll give it a
name shortly. So it will actually ask us to save and give a name to this table in a moment.
Typically, the way tables and databases work is that one of the fields– by the way, these are referred to as the
fields, so you’d have the ID field, the First Name field, and then Last Name field, and so on. So the columns– we
refer to them, where you’ll hear the term “field.” Then, you’ll also hear the term “record.” So it will say, this is
records 1 or a record 2 or record– the record is, think of it as the row here. So you have more than one piece of
information related to a record.
So you have, for example, first name, last name, address, and so on related to that specific customer. Here, this
would be the Field Name. So right now, it says ID. So we can change that to say Customer ID. The type here for
Customer ID– it typically needs to be a number. So notice under the data type, this is an order number. That
means that when it goes to the next customer, it will go– so from customer 1 to number 2, number 3, number 4
automatically.
The data type for each one of those fields typically has to be specified. The next one, it’s asking us, what type do
we want to make this next field here? So the next field here– we are going to make it text, and this will be First
Name. Then, the next one, we’re going to make this field type as well, short text here. And then we’re going to call
this Last Name. And then the third field, we are going to make this, let’s say, the street address, and this will be
text as well.
The next field here will be city, and then the next state, and then the next one, zip. And the zip code– we want that
probably as a number field. And then, the next one– you can pick whatever other field that you’re going to utilize,
but take note here that it can be various other fields. So it could be, for example, the date field, when they signed
up to be your customer and such. Or you can have an attachment for this customer. Or you could be able to post
a hyperlink field as well.
So in this case, we are going to create a field here for attachment, and that will be, for example, for the picture for
that customer or various other fields. Basically, this step is referred to as the designing this table, so we are
defining how the fields are going to be formatted.
If we are done with the design at this point, we could simply– we could do a couple things at this stage. We can
either enter the data directly from this table that we– and by the way, the data that you enter, from now on, from
this point on, it has to be matching the type that you defined a moment ago. For example, the zip code has to be a
number. It can’t have letters in there and things of that nature.
The other thing to keep in mind is is that the data typically– for now, we’re going to enter it here directly into the
table. But typically, it’s not entered from the table itself. It’s typically entered from the form of the database, and
we’ll learn about this shortly as well.
Let’s enter just one record here for the sake of testing. And then, if we go to the next record, notice it entered the
customer ID automatically. So the concepts so far that we’ve covered in this session– keep in mind when you
define those fields, you need to specify the data type, and it’s very important to think it through as to all the fields
that you want in a table when you’re designing your database.
So then, you want to make sure that all the fields that you would want in that particular table, they are included in
there. You can add them later as well, but it creates and causes complications. It’s best to think it over initially. The
other thing is that you need to consider categorizing the data accordingly in various categories, and then these
categories– they become your tables.
So for example, you want to make sure that, let’s say, customer information– anything related to the customer
such as the address, the preferences, and mailing address, and that type of thing, you’ll want to keep it in one
table. Then, anything related to orders, you’ll want to keep it on the Order table. Anything related to payments,
you would keep it in the Payments table. Anything that you want to keep related to inventory, you’ll want to keep in
the Inventory table. And even inventory could have all kinds of sub-tables as well.
The key there is to categorize information in major categories. Those categories become at least a table of some
sort. And then, you define the data type for each field here, and then you have to make sure that whatever you
enter in that field, you’ll want to make sure that it matches that type of data.
Also, remember, as you design your database, you need to have some kind of a key differentiator between the
records in your table. So for example, if you had two customers named as Hubert Sims and such, you want to
make sure how do they differ. And the way to differ from one customer, from one record to another, is by
assigning them something unique, presumably a customer ID, a unique customer ID. And those are typically
referred to– and that becomes your primary key. The primary key, again, is what will differentiate between two
records.
Once we are done with designing our first table here, you will click on Close here on the top right of this table, and
now it’ll ask us to give it a name to save the design for this table. It will actually save the design along with the data
that we just entered.
And now, notice here under the Tables list here on the left-hand side, we have Customers information. Now, to
open this up, you’ll simply double-click on it, and you’ll be able to view it and enter new records in there as well. If
you needed to change the design, you could simply click here to add additional fields, or another method to
change the data and change the design for this table is also by using the Design View.
So notice here under the Home tab, we have View. And there are a couple of views. There’s a Data Sheet View,
what we currently are seeing and utilizing, and then you also have the Design View. Let’s click here on Design
View, and this is a more sophisticated way– it’s a little bit more complicated if you’re not used to working with
databases. But yet, it’s actually a lot more powerful and a lot more useful.
So here, what you can do is basically, you can modify the structure of this table. On the left-hand side, you have
the field name, which is the column for each column in that table that we saw earlier. So we could change the
names here, or we could change the data type as well. If you have a lot of data on your table, and you go and
tinker and manipulate the data type, you might most likely get an error message. So keep it in mind as you design
your tables to try to do it as best as possible in the beginning, whether it’s the data type, the layout of the fields,
and such.
Now, from here, from the Design View– like I mentioned earlier, you can change the data type, so you can say,
OK, under the State, I want that– instead of 255 characters, I want that to be only the two-digit abbreviated
version of it, or you can make it 40 characters long, or whatever the length of the field there. So you can define
the field.
You can also change the format and the mask and all kinds of default values, and you can control all kinds of
additional settings here. So I’m not going to go into the more fancy options here, but for the big picture, you can
change it from the Data Sheet View, or you can change it from a Design View from here. Notice as well that you
can change the order of those fields by holding down the mouse, and you can move one field above the other one
as well and change the order of those fields.
To add new ones, you can add them here on the bottom. And then you have to define the data type as well. So
for example, this is a field for Comments. So this would be long text. So you’ll want to make sure here that the
user can enter enough text. I believe that’ll be 64,000 characters that it will accept in that field when you start
typing on it.
Once you are done within any of the design changes, now we click on Close here, and it’s going to save the
structure. Typically, this Save option– it takes place only when we change the structure of it. So one of the
concepts here is that if you change the structure of your table and the design of it, then it’s going to ask you and
prompt you to save it. However, if you are simply entering data, the data saves automatically into your database.
So that’s another concept to understand when using databases.
The other thing is is that databases are designed to be used by multiple users at the same time. So once you
have finalized your design, you can have 10 users, 15 users, 50 users, or however many users access and
update the table at the same time and work on the same file, the same database at the same time.
So those are some of the very basic concepts on getting started with an Access database and an Access table.
Now, this is not all. Next, we are going to enter some more data into this table, and then we’re going to create a
query. We’re going to create a form, and then we’re going to create a Quick Report with just one table.
And then furthermore– so stay tuned– we’re going to create multiple tables, and we’re going to link those tables
together, and then we’re going to utilize the more intermediate functions iun Access databases and using
Microsoft Access. So stay tuned.
Shelly Cashman: Microsoft Access 2016
Module 1: Databases and Database Objects: An Introduction
© 2017 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part, except for use as permitted in a license distributed with a certain product or service or otherwise on a password-protected website for classroom use.
‹#›
Objectives (1 of 2)
Describe the features of the Access window
Create a database
Create tables in Datasheet and Design views
Add records to a table
Close a database
Open a database
© 2017 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part, except for use as permitted in a license distributed with a certain product or service or otherwise on a password-protected website for classroom use.
‹#›
Objectives (2 of 2)
Print the contents of a table
Create and use a query
Create and use a form
Create and print custom reports
Modify a report in Layout view
Perform special database operations
Design a database to satisfy a collection of requirements
© 2017 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part, except for use as permitted in a license distributed with a certain product or service or otherwise on a password-protected website for classroom use.
‹#›
Project – Database Creation
© 2017 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part, except for use as permitted in a license distributed with a certain product or service or otherwise on a password-protected website for classroom use.
‹#›
Figure 1-1a: display of account table
Figure 1-1b: display of account manager table
4
Roadmap
Create the first table, Account Manager, using Datasheet view
Add records to the Account Manager table
Print the contents of the Account Manager table
Import records into the second table, Account
Modify the second table using Design view
Create a query for the Account table
Create a form for the Account table
Create a report for the Account table
© 2017 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part, except for use as permitted in a license distributed with a certain product or service or otherwise on a password-protected website for classroom use.
‹#›
Creating a Database (1 of 2)
To Create a Database
Run Access
Using the steps in the “To Create an Access Database” section in the Office and Windows module, create the database on your hard disk, OneDrive, or other storage location using the desired file name
© 2017 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part, except for use as permitted in a license distributed with a certain product or service or otherwise on a password-protected website for classroom use.
‹#›
Figure 1-2: display of how to create a database
6
Creating a Database (2 of 2)
To Create a Database Using a Template
If you have another database open, close it withot exiting Access by clicking File on the ribbon to open the Backstage view, and then clicking Close
If you do not see a template that you want, you can search Microsoft Office onlin for additional templates
Click the template you want to use. Be sure you have selected one that indicates it is for a desktop database
Enter a file name and select a location for the database
Click the Create button to create the database
© 2017 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part, except for use as permitted in a license distributed with a certain product or service or otherwise on a password-protected website for classroom use.
‹#›
7
The Access Window
Navigation Pane and Access Work Area
Define the following
Access work area
Object tabs
Navigation Pane
Status bar
Datasheet view
Datasheet
© 2017 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part, except for use as permitted in a license distributed with a certain product or service or otherwise on a password-protected website for classroom use.
‹#›
8
Determining Tables and Fields (1 of 2)
Naming Tables and Fields
Names can be us to 64 characters in length
Names can contain letters, digits, and spaces, as well as most of the punctuation symbols
Names cannot contain periods (.), exclamation point (!), accent graves (`), or square brackets ([])
Each field in a table must have a unique name
© 2017 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part, except for use as permitted in a license distributed with a certain product or service or otherwise on a password-protected website for classroom use.
‹#›
9
Determining Tables and Fields (2 of 2)
Determining the Primary Key
Unique identifier
Field called ID
Autonumber field
Determining Data Types for the Fields
Data type
Short Text
Number
Currency
Date & Time
© 2017 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part, except for use as permitted in a license distributed with a certain product or service or otherwise on a password-protected website for classroom use.
‹#›
10
Creating a Table (1 of 11)
Datasheet view – rows and columns, like a spreadsheet
Design view – only used to create a table or to modify the structure of a table
Caption – an assigned value to a field
© 2017 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part, except for use as permitted in a license distributed with a certain product or service or otherwise on a password-protected website for classroom use.
‹#›
Creating a Table (2 of 11)
To Modify the Primary Key
Click the Field Size text box to select the current field size, use either the DELETE or BACKSPACE keys to erase the current field size, and then type the new field size
Click the Name & Caption button to display the Enter Field Properties dialog box
Click the Caption text box, and then type the desired caption
Click the Description text box, and then type the desired description
Click the OK button to change the caption and description
© 2017 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part, except for use as permitted in a license distributed with a certain product or service or otherwise on a password-protected website for classroom use.
‹#›
Creating a Table (3 of 11)
To Define the Renaming Fields in a Table
Click the ‘Click to Add’ column heading to display a menu of available data types
Click the desired data type
Type the desired field name
Click the blank space below the field name to complete the change of the name. Click the blank space a second time to select the field
Change the field size, if necessary
© 2017 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part, except for use as permitted in a license distributed with a certain product or service or otherwise on a password-protected website for classroom use.
‹#›
Creating a Table (4 of 11)
Click the Save button on the Quick Access Toolbar to display the Save As dialog box
Type the desired table name
Click the OK button (Save As dialog box) to save the table
© 2017 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part, except for use as permitted in a license distributed with a certain product or service or otherwise on a password-protected website for classroom use.
‹#›
Figure 1-13: display using the views group and the change in the table name
14
Creating a Table (5 of 11)
To View the Table in Design View
Click the View button arrow to display the View menu
Click Design View on the View menu to view the table in Design view
© 2017 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part, except for use as permitted in a license distributed with a certain product or service or otherwise on a password-protected website for classroom use.
‹#›
Figure 1-15: The design view is displayed
15
Creating a Table (6 of 11)
To Change a Field Size in Design View
If necessary, click the vertical scroll bar to display the desired field. Click the row selector for the desired field to select the field
Click the Field Size box to display the Field Size arrow
Click the Field Size arrow to display the Field Size menu
Click the desired field size
Click the Format box to display the Format arrow
Click the Format arrow to open the Format menu
Click the Save button to save your changes
© 2017 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part, except for use as permitted in a license distributed with a certain product or service or otherwise on a password-protected website for classroom use.
‹#›
Creating a Table (7 of 11)
To Close the Table
Click the Close button for the open table to close the table
© 2017 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part, except for use as permitted in a license distributed with a certain product or service or otherwise on a password-protected website for classroom use.
‹#›
Creating a Table (8 of 11)
To Add Record to a Table
Right-click the table in the Navigation Pane to display the shortcut menu
Click Open on the shortcut menu to open the table in Datasheet view
Click the Shutter Bar Open/Close Button to close the Navigation Pane
Type the desired values in each field, pressing the TAB key to move to the next field
© 2017 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part, except for use as permitted in a license distributed with a certain product or service or otherwise on a password-protected website for classroom use.
‹#›
Creating a Table (9 of 11)
Making Changes to the Data
Undo
Add a record
Delete a record
Change the contents of a field
© 2017 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part, except for use as permitted in a license distributed with a certain product or service or otherwise on a password-protected website for classroom use.
‹#›
Creating a Table (10 of 11)
To Add Records to a Table that Contains Data
Run Access
Open desired database
Open the Navigation Pane
Click Open on the shortcut menu to open the table in Datasheet view
Close the Navigation Pane
Click the ‘New (blank) record’ button to move t a position to enter a new record
Close the table
© 2017 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part, except for use as permitted in a license distributed with a certain product or service or otherwise on a password-protected website for classroom use.
‹#›
Creating a Table (11 of 11)
To Resize Columns in a Datasheet
Point to the right boundary of the field selector so that the mouse pointer becomes a two-headed arrow
Double-click the right boundary of the field selector to resize the field so that it best fits the data
Save the changes to the layout by clicking the Save button on the Quick Access Toolbar
Click the table’s Close button to close the table
© 2017 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part, except for use as permitted in a license distributed with a certain product or service or otherwise on a password-protected website for classroom use.
‹#›
Previewing and Printing the Contents of a Table
To Preview and Print the Contents of a Table
If necessary, open the Navigation Pane and select the table you wish to preview and print
Click FILE on the ribbon to open the Backstage view
Click the Print tab in the Backstage view to display the Print gallery
Click the Print Preview button in the Print gallery to display a preview of what the table will look like when printed
Click the Print button to display the Print dialog box
Click the OK button to print the table
When the printer stops, retrieve the hard copy
Click the Close Print Preview button to close the Print Preview window
© 2017 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part, except for use as permitted in a license distributed with a certain product or service or otherwise on a password-protected website for classroom use.
‹#›
Importing or Linking Data From Other Applications to Access (1 of 3)
To Import an Excel Worksheet
Click EXTERNAL DATA on the ribbon to display the EXTERNAL DATA tab
Click the Excel button to display the Get External Data – Excel Spreadsheet dialog box
Click the Browse button in the Get External Data – Excel Spreadsheet dialog box
Navigate to and select the desired file
Click the Open button
With the option button to import the source data to a new table elected, click the OK button to display the Import Spreadsheet Wizard dialog box
Be sure the ‘First Row Contains Column Headings’ check box is selected
Click the Next button
Click the ‘Choose my own primary key’ option button
Click the Finish button
Click the Save Import button to save the import steps
© 2017 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part, except for use as permitted in a license distributed with a certain product or service or otherwise on a password-protected website for classroom use.
‹#›
Importing or Linking Data From Other Applications to Access (2 of 3)
© 2017 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part, except for use as permitted in a license distributed with a certain product or service or otherwise on a password-protected website for classroom use.
‹#›
Figure 1-45: click the next button
24
Importing or Linking Data From Other Applications to Access (3 of 3)
To Modify a Table in Design View
Right-click the desired table in the Navigation Pane to display the shortcut menu, and then click Design View on the shortcut menu to open the table in Design View
Click the Description box for the desired field and then type the desired text
Click the Save button on the Quick Access Toolbar to save your changes
© 2017 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part, except for use as permitted in a license distributed with a certain product or service or otherwise on a password-protected website for classroom use.
‹#›
Additional Database Objects (1 of 6)
To Use the Simple Query Wizard to Create a Query
If necessary, open the Navigation Pane
Select the table you wish to query
Click CREATE on t he ribbon to display the CREATE tab
Click the Query Wizard button to display the New Query dialog box
Be sure Simple Query Wizard is selected, and then click the OK button (New Query dialog box) to display the Simple Query Wizard dialog box
© 2017 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part, except for use as permitted in a license distributed with a certain product or service or otherwise on a password-protected website for classroom use.
‹#›
Figure 1-55: add selected fields
26
Additional Database Objects (2 of 6)
To Use a Criterion in a Query
Right-click the query to open in the Navigation Pane to produce a shortcut menu
Click Design View on the shortcut menu to open the query in Design view
Click the Criteria row in the column for the field for which you want to specify the criteria, and then type the criteria
Click the Run button to run the query and display the results in Datasheet view
© 2017 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part, except for use as permitted in a license distributed with a certain product or service or otherwise on a password-protected website for classroom use.
‹#›
Additional Database Objects (3 of 6)
To Create a Form
Select the table in the Navigation Pane for which you want to create a form
If necessary, click CREATE on the ribbon to display the CREATE tab
Click the Form button to create a simple form
Click the Form View button on the Access status bar to display the form in Form view
Click the Next record button to move to the next record
Click the Save button on the Quick Access Toolbar to display the Save As dialog box
Type the desired form name, and then click the OK button to save the form
Click the Close button for the form to close the form
© 2017 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part, except for use as permitted in a license distributed with a certain product or service or otherwise on a password-protected website for classroom use.
‹#›
Additional Database Objects (4 of 6)
To Create a Report
Select the table in the Navigation Pane for which you want to create the report
Click CREATE on the ribbon to display the CREATE tab
Click the Report button to create the report
Click the Save button on the Quick Access Toolbar to display the Save As dialog box and then type the name of the report
Click the OK button (Save As dialog box) to save the report
Close the report by tapping or clicking its Close button
© 2017 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part, except for use as permitted in a license distributed with a certain product or service or otherwise on a password-protected website for classroom use.
‹#›
Additional Database Objects (5 of 6)
To Modify Report Column Headings and Resize Columns
Right-click the report in the Navigation Pane you wish to modify and then click Layout View on the shortcut menu
If a Field list appears, click the Add Existing Fields button to remove the Field list from the screen
Close the Navigation Pane
Click the column heading you wish to modify two times
Type the new column heading
Point to the right boundary of the heading for the column you wish to resize until the mouse pointer changes to a two-headed arrow and then drag the right boundary to the desired position
© 2017 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part, except for use as permitted in a license distributed with a certain product or service or otherwise on a password-protected website for classroom use.
‹#›
Additional Database Objects (6 of 6)
To Add Totals to a Report
Click the field you want to total
Click DESIGN on the ribbon to display the DESIGN tab
Click the Totals button to display the list of available calculations
Click Sum to calculate the sum of the amount of paid values
Click the Save button on the Quick Access Toolbar to save your changes to the report layout
Close the report
© 2017 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part, except for use as permitted in a license distributed with a certain product or service or otherwise on a password-protected website for classroom use.
‹#›
Database Properties
To Change Database Properties
Click FILE on the ribbon to open the Backstage view
If necessary, click the Info tab in the Backstage view to display the Info gallery
Click the ‘View and edit database properties’ link in the right pane of the Info gallery
Enter the desired database properties
Click the OK button to save your changes
© 2017 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part, except for use as permitted in a license distributed with a certain product or service or otherwise on a password-protected website for classroom use.
‹#›
Special Database Operations (1 of 3)
To Back Up a Database
Open the database to be backed up
Click FILE on the ribbon to open the Backstage view, and then tap or click the Save As tab
With Save Database As selected in the File Types area, click ‘Back Up Database’ in the Save Database As area, and then click the Save As button
Navigate to the desired location in the Save As box. If you do not want the name Access has suggested, enter the desired name in the File name text box
Click the Save button to back up the database
© 2017 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part, except for use as permitted in a license distributed with a certain product or service or otherwise on a password-protected website for classroom use.
‹#›
Special Database Operations (2 of 3)
To Compact and Repair a Database
Open the database to be compacted
Click FILE on the ribbon to open the Backstage view, and then, if necessary, select the Info tab
Click the ‘Compact & Repair Database’ button in the Info gallery to compact and repair the database
© 2017 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part, except for use as permitted in a license distributed with a certain product or service or otherwise on a password-protected website for classroom use.
‹#›
Special Database Operations (3 of 3)
Additional Operations
Closing a database without exiting Access
Saving a database with another name
Deleting a table or other object in the database
Renaming an object in the database
© 2017 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part, except for use as permitted in a license distributed with a certain product or service or otherwise on a password-protected website for classroom use.
‹#›
Database Design
Database Design Process
Identify the Tables
Determine the Primary Keys
Determine Additional Fields
Determine and Implement Relationships between the Tables
Assign Data Types to the Fields
Identify and Remove Redundancy
© 2017 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part, except for use as permitted in a license distributed with a certain product or service or otherwise on a password-protected website for classroom use.
‹#›




Why Choose Us

  • 100% non-plagiarized Papers
  • 24/7 /365 Service Available
  • Affordable Prices
  • Any Paper, Urgency, and Subject
  • Will complete your papers in 6 hours
  • On-time Delivery
  • Money-back and Privacy guarantees
  • Unlimited Amendments upon request
  • Satisfaction guarantee

How it Works

  • Click on the “Place Order” tab at the top menu or “Order Now” icon at the bottom and a new page will appear with an order form to be filled.
  • Fill in your paper’s requirements in the "PAPER DETAILS" section.
  • Fill in your paper’s academic level, deadline, and the required number of pages from the drop-down menus.
  • Click “CREATE ACCOUNT & SIGN IN” to enter your registration details and get an account with us for record-keeping and then, click on “PROCEED TO CHECKOUT” at the bottom of the page.
  • From there, the payment sections will show, follow the guided payment process and your order will be available for our writing team to work on it.